SSDI versus SSI

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PostPosted: Tue Jun 30, 2009 8:23 pm   Post subject: SSDI versus SSI  

My husband applied for SSDI. He has just recieved his letter from the judge that he has made a favoriable decsion without a formal hearing. and thats great, but the very last paragraph says it is for Supplemental Security Income. Why did they change it from SSDI to SSI in his case? Also we have a deaf child that does recieve SSI, will she lose her SSI? I am so confused.

My husband has worked and paid into social security all his life, before he became ill, he worked almost 20 years in a row. Only changed jobs once in that time. He was denied the first time, then he got a lawyer and on the appeal, after it went to the judge, he won. We have not recieved the letter or explanation of benefits yet, but I dont understand the process to get from SSDI to SSI.


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PostPosted: Wed Jul 01, 2009 2:27 am   Post subject:   

Great question, and one that has befuddled people since inception. Let me see if I can shed some light on this.



Supplemental Security Income, or SSI, is a federal program designed primarily to help blind, disabled and those age 65 or older. It is not funded through S.S. taxation, like SSDI, but instead is paid for from the general tax revenues. It's purpose is to provide basic assistance for food, shelter and clothes, and supplements other income of the recipient, such as unemployment, disability coverage, SSDI, etc. It's normally easier to get than SSDI, which is a pain in the you-know-where, and judges commonly award SSI benefits which is based on financial need, not disability alone.



SSDI is a whole 'nother story indeed. Social Security Disability Income has a bunch of qualifiers (so does SSI, but not nearly as stringent) that have to be met in order to qualify:



The disabled person must

* be both fully-insured and disability insured through the SS system, which it sounds like your husband is.

* have a disability that's expected to last at least 12 months or end in death.

* be unable to work at any substantial occupation in the U.S. economy in either the disabled person's former job or any other job that they feel you can "adjust to" ("any occupation" definition).

* be totally disabled.



This definition of disability is on another planet. Truth be known, SSDI applicants routinely get turned down initially 75% of the time and it takes (on average) 3-5 years to be approved- normally with the help of a lawyer.



If you can give us some more info to kind of "fill in the blanks" so to speak, we can give you some more info back!



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PostPosted: Wed Jul 01, 2009 10:28 am   Post subject:   

Hi Ins Teacher, Thanks. Let me give you abit more info.



Husband is 52 this year. Became disabled in Nov. 2006. Applied for SSDI in 2007 he has, Diabetes type 2. Neuropothhy, not the kind from the diabetes but the other kind, carpul tunnel, that he has had surgery for but the nerve damage was to great and thats from the neuropothy, sever sleep apnea, sever asthma. He walks like he is drunk but does not drink, his legs and arms are constantly in pain, and when he sleeps his feet and legs and his arms twitch, pretty badly. he can not sit or stand long maybe 30-45 minutes. If we go to the store, once we get home he has to lay down for an hour or so. He take about 18 medications each day. He is in a deep depression because he feels worthless. He has his good days and bad. On a good day he might go with the kids to the park or sit with us and watch a movie in the living room, on a bad day he gets up takes a shower brushes his teeth and lays back in the bed. So far as the SSI my daughter gets, she is totally deaf. Profound hearing loss. I am not sure if this information has helped, but if you can think of anything else you might need just let me know.

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PostPosted: Wed Jul 01, 2009 11:05 am   Post subject:   

I think one needs to satisfy the income level criteria to receive SSI benefits. May be you were awarded SSI benefit on that ground.



You have mentioned that you had a lawyer to look after the case. What he has to say in this regard? Have to contacted him after getting the letter from the judge?

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PostPosted: Wed Jul 01, 2009 1:28 pm   Post subject:   

Hi sgladman1969,



I've gone through both of your posts and now trying to ascertain what went wrong with the SSDI application.

Did you have medical documents that support his being totally disabled?



Quote:
He was denied the first time, then he got a lawyer and on the appeal, after it went to the judge, he won.


So, now do you know the causes of the initial denial?



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PostPosted: Wed Jul 01, 2009 10:16 pm   Post subject:   

I dont know why he was denied the first time, yes all the medical proofs have been sent to the lawyers and social security. And the neuropothy was discovered after the first denial. Don't know if that helps.


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PostPosted: Thu Jul 02, 2009 3:41 am   Post subject:   

Hi Sassy,



Quote:
And the neuropothy was discovered after the first denial. Don't know if that helps.




Was it included the second time you applied with the help of the lawyer?
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PostPosted: Thu Jul 02, 2009 8:57 am   Post subject:   

Yes they requested all his medical files from all 5 of his Doctors, and the Doctors all had to fill out medical evaluation forms.


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PostPosted: Thu Jul 02, 2009 12:36 pm   Post subject:   

Hi sgladman1969..



Quote:
I dont know why he was denied the first time, yes all the medical proofs have been sent to the lawyers and social security.


Since he'd won it following his appeal, please check whether he remembers any cause of the denial. Did he qualify as being "totally disabled"?



Quote:
Yes they requested all his medical files from all 5 of his Doctors, and the Doctors all had to fill out medical evaluation forms.


Do you possess copies of these medical evaluation forms?



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PostPosted: Thu Jul 09, 2009 2:20 pm   Post subject: ssi/ssdi  

i would call ssa and speak with a rep. the possibility is there that it was an error.if he had enough work credits, he is entitled to ssdi because he paid into it.definitely look further into it because his ssdi will pay at a much higer rate, than ssi. was his application for ssi or ssdi or both? he would only be eligible for ssi if your family income in total falls below a certain determine amout. i believe it is 3000 a month, but dont quote me. check the ssa site under ssi frequently asked questions.

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PostPosted: Fri Sep 02, 2011 2:09 pm   Post subject: hello  

The difference between SSDI and SSI has to do with with the amount of work credits toward Social Security that you have accumlated over the past ten years. If you have worked and paid into SS for 20 of the last 40 quarters, and meet all the requirements for SSDI, then you are eligible for SSDI. If you meet all the requirements for SSDI but do not have enough work credits or are too young to have worked, then you are not eligible for SSDI and can only receive SSI, which is considerably less money per month that SSDI. If you need more information on this subject check out . It has a lot of really valuable information.


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PostPosted: Sun Sep 04, 2011 10:52 am   Post subject:   

Quote:
If you have worked and paid into SS for 20 of the last 40 quarters, and meet all the requirements for SSDI, then you are eligible for SSDI.


This is mostly incorrect and/or oversimplified.



SSI is not at all connected to SSDI. The eligibility criteria are completely different and entirely unrelated. A person may receive both SSDI and SSI when the circumstances are correct.



I would not trust SSAdvocate to be mine.


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PostPosted: Thu Sep 08, 2011 12:17 am   Post subject:   

I am completely worn out by this thread. I think a little accuracy is needed here...



SSI and SSDI are completely different programs. Sounds like the issue is with SSI, so I will elucidate.



Supplemental Security Income = SSI



Supplemental Security Income is a Federal income supplement program funded by general tax revenues (not Social Security taxes). So, what you've paid into the S.S. system (or haven't paid in) is completely immaterial for SSI purposes. This info taken from ssa.gov



It's a supplemental program designed for anyone aged 65 or older and those who are blind or disabled who have little or no income. It's there for what the Fed GubMint terms "to provide cash assistance to meet basic needs for food, clothing, and shelter."



Again, nothing to do with S.S. taxes.



The applicant must have limited resources and income, is a U.S. citizen or national, or one of certain eligible categories of aliens (in general, an alien who is subject to an active warrant for deportation or removal does not meet the citizenship/alien requirement).



The applicant must be a resident of one of the 50 States, the District of Columbia, or the Northern Mariana Islands; and is not absent from the country for a full calendar month or more than 30 consecutive days; and applies for any other cash benefits or payments for which he or she may be eligible, (for example, pensions, Social Security benefits).



Finally, the SSI beneficiary must give the SSA permission to contact any financial institution and request any financial records that the financial institution may have about the applicant, and the applicant files an application; and meets certain other requirements.



What is considered "blindness" and "disabled" for SSI purposes?



"Blindness" in Social Security disability programs is "statutory blindness," which means you have a central visual acuity of 20/200 or less in your better eye with use of a correcting lens; or you have a visual field limitation in your better eye, such that the widest diameter of the visual field subtends an angle no greater than 20 degrees.



An individual age 18 and older is "disabled" if he or she has a medically determinable physical or mental impairment, which results in the inability to do any substantial gainful activity; and can be expected to result in death; or has lasted or can be expected to last for a continuous period of not less than 12 months.



WOW! That's almost the same as SSDI without the S.S. taxes part!



There ya be. That's SSI. Anyone want to argue with me? Bring it!



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