Not enough credit points for SS cash benefits

Message Author
ampm-bookmark
delicious-small Add to delicious
yahoomyweb-small Add to YahooMyWeb
blinklist-small Add to BlinkList
PostPosted: Tue Sep 21, 2010 1:28 am   Post subject: Not enough credit points for SS cash benefits  

Hello there everyone!

I have a real interesting question for all who read my post. If you do not wish to read the whole thing, just jump to the third paragraph and read from there, but the whole thing is interesting, so, I hope you do read the whole thing.



I was disabled 100% by Social Security some years back, but the problem I had, and still have, is that, I did NOT qualify for any Social Security cash-benefits whatsoever, due to lack of the so-called credit points or quarter points during the period when I first applied for SS benefits. They said I would have had to have an input of $10,000 during that quarter or period for me to qualify for the cash-benefits. When I applied, the amount of money going into the system had been changed from $5,000 to the now $10,000, which is what really messed me up to not being able to collect a monthly SS check. Since I went from job to job due to being laid off (due to my ill-health any not being considered a good asset to the companies I worked for), or having to just quit altogether, again, due to my heath problems, I would go for long periods without a job. When I felt I was ready for another job, even after getting hired, I nevertheless could not perform well and therefore was not able to retain the job for long periods, and so I would eventually just end up being laid off again or just quitting cause my body could not tolerate the long hours. I, nevertheless, during those times WAS contributing to the SS system, even if it was little, I nevertheless did so.



When I, FINALLY, decided to apply for disability, according to them, it wasn't enough for me to qualify for the cash-benefits at the time I applied for disability. It is so, until I pass away; to which my family would then get a small SS benefits-check, or after I reach retirement age; which I still have quite a long ways to go before I reach that age. So, only that way, or only then, would I be able to get some cash-benefits. That’s what they would say in the interviews and in all the correspondences I used to get in the mail from SS. They DID disable me 100%, but I did NOT qualify for the cash benefits, or the monthly check. The only cash benefit I qualified for, and received for a while, was a small, ridiculous $24 Supplemental monthly-check, which wasn't worth the trips to the SS office-appointments, doctor's long-wait visits, and all the paper-work involved and on and on...all that for the $24 to me was just totally not worth it and totally ridiculous, so I just forgot about the whole thing. I did also have Medicaid coverage, but NOT Medicare, which to me was also useless because practically ALL medication the doctors would prescribe to me usually got me even sicker still, than what I already am due to my stomach and my system not being able to tolerate the medications, and so I would just get sicker and more depressed then what I already was, and still get at times. So, that $24 supplemental-check, I just forgot about that and now I just try to hang on and do the best I can with home-remedies, cheap herbs and stuff like that, an a lot of eggs which are good for a diseased liver and are probably what have kept me going, or alive.



Anyway, I don't know how to go about getting some cash-benefits from SS, so, after having said all these, my question to anyone out there who might be very, VERY familiar, and very knowledgeable on SS and disability benefits, is:

Is there some kind of hidden, or not very-well-known SS program where a disabled person, such as myself, can take advantage of, which would qualify me for cash-benefits from DECSEASED persons who may have NOT exhausted their SS benefits?



The reason I ask this my friends is because, I heard from this person who found out about my situation (about me not qualifying for SS cash-benefits due to lack of enough credit-points even though I was disabled 100%), told me very adamantly, (it just came out from him as if he knew what he was talking about) that there IS such a program where people in my situation could apply for, and that the cash-benefits I could very possibly qualify for and receive, would be from those DECEASED people's SS benefits, but which they never finished collecting due to their passing on.

Is that true; anyone? Is there such program? Is there anyone wishing to answer this question for me? I wasn't told any of that by the attorneys who handled my case, but after hearing that-one person telling me about it, I started thinking about it cause it made sense to me and so from then on, I have always wondered if it is something lawyers don't want the public to know about, unless they are pushed, and pushed about it, or unless someone wit real authority who works for the system, or maybe even a politician, suggests or advices the lawyer to go ahead and permit the disabled client to apply for that program?



If, according to what I've heard on TV and what I have read is true; (that people who receive SS benefits are getting back MORE money than what they actually put into SS fund), then it would only make sense that people who are also in a similar situation such as myself, should also be able to apply for some of that extra cash, or some of that over-payment those people are getting or were getting before they passed away. Again, if they did NOT put that much money into the system, but STILL are able to get some of that over-payment in their monthly-checks, through that particular government-program; whichever or whatever it may be or whatever name it goes by, then I believe people who are also in the same situation as I am should be able to apply for, qualify, and collect a monthly check, whether they have enough credit or quarter points, as they call them, or not? Don’t you agree with me? Do you understand what I’m saying?



IS THERE SUCH A PROGRAM? Will someone help me on this? Anyone have any info about this? Even if it's just a little tiny bit of info having to do with such a program; it would really make feel much better if I can get other people's input regarding all these, but especially if it in agreement with what that guy told me, and which is what I just related to you all, (that there is such a program)?

My many thanks to all those who read my lengthy post, and to all of you who are also able and willing to answer anything whatsoever having to do with my situation/question. I also hope my question was very clear, but also very clearly understood?

To all those who are also in the same situation as I am, I hope you get well and that you can find the help you all need.

God bless, and best regards to all. M. B. El Paso, Tx.

oceanriver
New member
Leave a quick message



Joined: 19 Sep 2010
Posts: 5


3.43 Dollars($)

PostPosted: Tue Sep 21, 2010 2:24 am   Post subject:   

oceanriver...Whew! That was some post! Let me see if I can shed some light on your situation. Let me start by clearing up the S.S. earnings confusion.



You get out of S.S. based on what you've paid into S.S. As you've probably learned, S.S. benefits are paid for through payroll taxation. You and your employer share the costs equally; FICA and the Medicare deductions come out of your gross paycheck. For every calendar quarter you pay into the S.S. system that meets their requirements to earn a work credit. For 2010, every (I think) $1120 of earnings gets you a work credit. I could be wrong on that number if anyone wants to check. You can earn a maximum of 4 credits per year. In order to receive most S.S. benefits, you have to meet their definition of "fully insured," which means you must have earned at least 40 credits, or 10 years of paying into the system. Most people are fully insured. If you are young and something happens, there's the possibility that you will still qualify based on your earnings to date.



For S.S. Disability Income benefits (SSDI), you must be fully insured through the S.S. system. In addition, you must also be "disability insured;" this mean that of those 40 credits you have to have, 20 of those credits must have been earned in the last 10 years. So, if you haven't earned many credits recently, that could have impacted your ability to receive benefits- you must be both fully and disability insured in order to get SSDI.



It is unlikely you will be able to collect benefits from another person's S.S. contributions. For this to happen, you must be a disabled widow or widower and only starting at age 50. Don't think that applies to you given your post.



I understand your concern over not being able to receive benefits. This statement needs to be addressed:

Quote:
They said I would have had to have an input of $10,000 during that quarter or period for me to qualify for the cash-benefits. When I applied, the amount of money going into the system had been changed from $5,000 to the now $10,000, which is what really messed me up to not being able to collect a monthly SS check.




I really don't know what that means. That means, if you do the math, that you would have to have earnings of at least $40,000/year in order to qualify for benefits. To illustrate, I had to go and get the link for the S.S. Administration: (by the way, I was right on the $$$ amount I said earlier)



http://www.ssa.gov/glossary.htm



Finally, your statement of

Quote:
I heard from this person who found out about my situation (about me not qualifying for SS cash-benefits due to lack of enough credit-points even though I was disabled 100%), told me very adamantly, (it just came out from him as if he knew what he was talking about) that there IS such a program where people in my situation could apply for, and that the cash-benefits I could very possibly qualify for and receive, would be from those DECEASED people's SS benefits, but which they never finished collecting due to their passing on.

Is that true; anyone? Is there such program?




Part of this was addressed above, but about your friend who was "adamant" about this, he may have been thinking about other parts of S.S. which don't relate to disability. For instance, S.S. has benefits which are payable to children, widows and widowers based on various criteria when an insured worker dies and other things. This is a complicated area. I have been working with S.S. stuff for a long time and I still get really confused at times. So, I hope this answered part of your concerns. As to the thought of "getting more than you paid in" and you should get some of that money. Ummmmm...... nope.



Your quote:

Quote:
If, according to what I've heard on TV and what I have read is true; (that people who receive SS benefits are getting back MORE money than what they actually put into SS fund), then it would only make sense that people who are also in a similar situation such as myself, should also be able to apply for some of that extra cash, or some of that over-payment those people are getting or were getting before they passed away. Again, if they did NOT put that much money into the system, but STILL are able to get some of that over-payment in their monthly-checks, through that particular government-program; whichever or whatever it may be or whatever name it goes by, then I believe people who are also in the same situation as I am should be able to apply for, qualify, and collect a monthly check, whether they have enough credit or quarter points, as they call them, or not? Don’t you agree with me? Do you understand what I’m saying?




I understand what you're saying, but I absolutely don't agree with your thoughts. This is INSURANCE. When insurance pays, in almost every instance you get more out of it than you paid into it. Think of your house insurance- you pay the insurer $500 a year, the house burns down and they pay $400k. You pay $14 a month for a $200,000 term life policy, die and the beneficiary get $200k. The examples are endless.



The difference is that this if the Fed GubMint, and they can't handle money, and so unlike just about every insurer, they have huge problems. They make their own rules and insurers have to comply with state and federal rules- they can't make up their own like the GubMint.



Lastly, S.S. is not, has never been and will never be an entitlement program. You have to pay in to get these benefits, as it should be. Medicaid is an entitlement program funded by taxes on state and federal levels for those who qualify. Your Medicaid program is paying for a lot more, I think, than you stated in your post.



If you need more, let us know!



InsTeacher Cool
InsTeacher
Forum Expert
Leave a quick message

InsTeacher
Forum Expert

Joined: 13 Aug 2007
Posts: 1398

Location: Oregon, USA
127.26 Dollars($)

PostPosted: Tue Sep 21, 2010 6:28 am   Post subject:   

Quote:
The difference is that this if the Fed GubMint, and they can't handle money, and so unlike just about every insurer, they have huge problems. They make their own rules and insurers have to comply with state and federal rules- they can't make up their own like the GubMint.




InsTeacher has said everything correctly, and most of the people and friends oceanriver consults are fools.



Although they have figured out how to pay benefits to some people who have never paid in, Social Security still requires that someone related to them must have paid in at least the minimum required to be fully or currently insured for its Disability benefits. Apparently, oceanriver, you did not meet that test, as simple as it actually is. And now you're upset.



Well, there is no program for you to collect on the contribution records of deceased folks you were not married or related to either. Never has been, and as much as it hurts to admit it, even the idiots in Congress are not so stupid as to allow that. I hate giving credit where it really is not due.



Your misinformation about $5000 and $10,000 qualifiers for Social Security Disability, as InsTeacher pointed out, is a figment of your imagination. And they didn't change the rules about it just before you got there.



And InsTeacher is dead center on target about the GubMint's inability to do anything at a profit, or just at the break-even point. They payback 100% of a person's own contributions to the Social Security system within 24-30 months. Then what? Phantom money, Monopoly money, IOUs. And now there are $2+ TRILLION of them lying around, and another $85+ TRILLION are going to join them over the next 65-70 years.



Don't get me started. As a less than productive member of the American population, what makes you think the government has any special responsibility to you? (Sorry if that's too harsh, but how else might you characterize it? It's very nearly the same line of reasoning illegal immigrant proponents use in their feeble attempt to seek "immigration reform").


_________________

CA-licensed Life & Disability Analyst. CA Insurance Lic #0596197. Also investigating insurance company abuses, and providing litigation support/expert witness services. Send me your questions, and I'll send you my answers.
MaxHerr
Forum Expert
Leave a quick message

MaxHerr
Forum Expert

Joined: 29 Nov 2009
Posts: 7888

Location: Pomona CA
107.52 Dollars($)

PostPosted: Sat Sep 25, 2010 12:48 pm   Post subject:   

Quote:
And now you're upset.


Now, so many of us have a reason to be upset. I'd still wonder how we can expect to get our needs covered under the SS when we couldn't even meet the min. payment criteria.
JeremyHolter
Senior member
Leave a quick message

Jeremy Holter

Joined: 06 Jun 2007
Posts: 1185


210.40 Dollars($)

PostPosted: Sun Sep 26, 2010 5:58 am   Post subject:   

Quote:
I'd still wonder how we can expect to get our needs covered under the SS when we couldn't even meet the min. payment criteria.




I'm not sure what your commenting about, Jeremy. Minimum payment criteria? All it takes is about $4500 per year (in 2010) to earn the maximum 4 credits for the year. In ten years, one will obtain the 40 credits necessary to be "fully insured".



But, if a person only earn the minimum amount of money necessary to obtain the 40 credits, and continued to just earn that kind of money to retirement, what would they expect to receive as a benefit?



Social Security is actuarily based, but not actuarily sound. A person's own contributions are typically paid back in the first 30-40 months of retirement. And the typical retiree is now living some 20 years or more into retirement. Where is all the money going to come from?



Let alone covering one's needs.



Social Security was never meant to meet a person's "needs", only to provide a safety net for those who have little or nothing saved on their own.


_________________

CA-licensed Life & Disability Analyst. CA Insurance Lic #0596197. Also investigating insurance company abuses, and providing litigation support/expert witness services. Send me your questions, and I'll send you my answers.
MaxHerr
Forum Expert
Leave a quick message

MaxHerr
Forum Expert

Joined: 29 Nov 2009
Posts: 7888

Location: Pomona CA
107.52 Dollars($)

Quick Reply
Your Name
Subject
Message body
All times are GMT
Page 1 of 1


Get a Quote
Ask Community Experts

flash plugin

Quick Links

Must See

Community

Hot topics in forums

Latest in blogs

    Connection Error: Connection refused