How much do insurance agents make?

Submitted by scottdwayne7 on Tue, 11/13/2007 - 14:43
Insurance agents can have a rewarding career, and more so, since nowadays individuals have recognized the need for having insurance protection. However, it's difficult to predict the exact earnings of an insurance agent. That is because, an agent's earnings depend on his client base and how much insurance coverage he can sell. Thus, the more you put your effort as an agent, the more policies you'll sell and the more will be your income.

To know how an insurance agent earns, you must be aware of their mode of work. Based on how they work, insurance agents are broadly classified into two types:

  1. Captive agents - Those who represent a particular insurance company.
  2. Independent agents - Those who sell insurance products from various insurance companies.
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How much do the Captive agents earn?

Captive agents are employees of an insurance company and usually have fixed wages. The initial few months would be the training and learning phase for such an agent. Thereafter, the insurers usually set a target for each agent which has to be fulfilled within a pre-determined time period. According to his or her performance, his or her salary gets revised. There might even be a scope of earning performance bonuses, after the agent meet the target. The salary structure usually depends on a number of factors like the location, the company etc.

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How much do the Independent agents earn?

The independent agents represent multiple companies. They don't get a fixed remuneration from the insurance companies. They usually receive a percentage commission from the insurer, which depends on the amount of insurance they sell. Moreover, revenue is only generated on sale of new policies. Thus, to earn more, the agents need to sell more insurance policies.

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What is the range of income?

The average income of an insurance agent is around $62,970 for a year, as the May 2011 reports of the Bureau of Labor Statistics have pointed out. However, since the individual income is generally based on the commissions earned, skilled agents having a large number of clients can earn much more than the BLS mean. The yearly income of around 50 percent of the agents ranges from $33,850 to $72,490, with the experienced ones earning as high as $115,300 on an average per year or even more than that.

Employment Annual mean wage Annual median wage
$3,21,780 $62,970 $47,450

Area Names Employment Annual mean wage Annual median wage
Arizona $6,390 $51,980 $40,750
California $23,890 $75,140 $59,240
Florida $26,940 $59,420 $46,530
Kansas $4,070 $56,010 $45,130
Nevada $2,250 $51,580 $35,640
New York $18,580 $74,890 $57,180
Texas $26,490 $57,820 $40,630
Washington $5,830 $54,710 $46,770
source

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How much can be the agent commission?

The independent agents working for the insurance companies usually earn from the commissions after each policy sale. The agent compensation is usually paid only for the initial year of a new policy. The agents selling homeowner's insurance and auto insurance receive around 10 to 15 percent commission on the first year's policy premiums. The allowed compensation depends on the insurers though, and can be as low as 8 percent or as high as 15 percent. Life insurance agents earn a lot more, typically in the first year only. They usually receive most of the premium that the policy holder pays in the first year, or even all of it at times.

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Is there a scope for earning more?

Apart from the standard commissions which solely depend on each individual agent's performance, the insurance agents have the scope of earning more if the client renews the coverage. The renewals commissions typically range between 2 to 5 percent for each policy.

Along with that, any insurance companies also offer year-end bonuses and non-cash rewards like trips and prizes for the insurance agents.

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Reading discussions & reading

How much do insurance agents make? Do insurance agents make good money at all ?

Posted: 13 Nov 2007 05:13 Post Subject: how much do you make selling insurance ?

Hi scottdwayne7,

Thanks for the question, but it is a very broad one.

The short answer would be that a good insurance agent will make as much as he/she really wants to make.

An insurance agent just starting out with a "captive" company will normally be guaranteed a certain income for the first few months. This period allows the agent to learn the insurance company and the insurance products being offered. Normally at the end of this "guaranteed" period, the agent must have produced sales to at least equal the guaranteed starting income (commissions).

Now, do insurance agents make good money ?

In a situation where an agent works for an independent agency, normally the pay structure is "commission only", but this agent may have access to several thousand established insurance customers. This situation certainly helps in the most difficult area of being an insurance agent - prospecting.

Some insurance agents just want to work on their own and actually be independent agents themselves. I think this is the most difficult way to start an insurance career because it is usually just commissions from new sales and the agent may or may not be furnished prospective customers by the insurance carriers.

How much an insurance agent makes also depends on the lines of insurance in which he/she works. For example - property and casualty insurance may pay a 12-15% commission, while a life insurance contract may pay as high as 100% commission.

I personally know insurance agents who make in excess of $1 Million per year and I also know agents who make $30,000 per year.

There is no ceiling on an insurance agents pay. In fact, most insurance agents I know make exactly what they think they are worth.

Posted: 27 Nov 2007 11:51 Post Subject: how much do insurance agents make?

I think insurane maze just about covered the whole spectrum of it when he said that an agent generally makes what they think they are worth. I am a captive agent right now and my income has gradually increased over the last few years. I dont think I wouldve been able to do that working a salaried job. But the reason for the increase was not a larger influx of customers, it was my growing confidence in what I was doing. So he is very correct about that.

I read somewhere that when Jim Carey was fresh in his acting career, he wrote himself a check for 10 million dollars and put it in his wallet, knowing that one day he would be able to cash it. Hmmmmmmmmm maybe I should try that for insurance!!!

Posted: 28 Nov 2007 06:03 Post Subject: how much do insurance agents earn ?

I read somewhere that when Jim Carey was fresh in his acting career, he wrote himself a check for 10 million dollars and put it in his wallet, knowing that one day he would be able to cash it.



Wow!! I didn't know that. That proves how confident he was about his acting ability.

Anyways, after what Insurance Maze has already said I don't have much to add but your compensation will depend on a couple of things.

But, do insurance agents make good money ?

It will depend on the type of agent you are- captive or independent. If you are a captive agent you are entitled to a fix amount of remuneration over and above the commission you earn from the sales. But at the same time you lose the flexibility to earn from different policies. On the other hand, independent agency runs on ‘no sell, no commission' basis.

The company you are associated with. Typically an agent's commission depends upon the insurance company he is associated with. And all the companies have their own commission structure.

The type insurance you sell. It goes without saying that it's important to understand why people buy life insurance from you.

A life agent can earn around 30-50% (approx) commission on term life policies and about 90-95% upon the first year premium of the whole life plan.

Posted: 09 Feb 2008 05:04 Post Subject: how much do insurance agents earn ?

how much money do insurance agents make?? ..hmmm....well, you can make in six figures if you have been in this business for at least 10 years.

Posted: 14 Feb 2008 07:10 Post Subject: how much money do insurance agents make ?

Initially I used to wonder how much money do insurance agents make !
When I first started out just over 20 years ago I make $50-$60,000/year. I am now a top advisor who does a broad range of wealth management as well for clients.

This week alone I will make $236,000 on new life insurance commissions. In addition I have 20 years of renewals and trailers from investments coming in each week.

If you can make it to the top it is very rewarding.

Posted: 14 Feb 2008 09:54 Post Subject: how much do you make selling insurance ?

I'd say typical earnings for new agents who work hard range from $45 to 60K 1st year. Second year is probably 60K to $120K for hard workers.

Posted: 14 Feb 2008 11:13 Post Subject: how much money do insurance agents make ?

And...if you are energetic, educated, spirited, creative, an entrepreneur and willing to take a bit of a risk...you could even make a half million to a million dollars per year.

You need to have a complete understanding of the inner workings of the internet and with some good help...you'll be there.

I happen to be all of the above...with the exception of having a complete understanding of the internet. Therefore I am not making a million bucks per year.

Posted: 07 Mar 2008 10:03 Post Subject: do insurance agents make money ?

I am attempting to find out more about the insurance field before I choose to dedicate my time and money. I know there are several different licenses one can obtain in the insurance market eg. auto insurance agent, life insurance agent etc. Which do most have and which do you suggest for someone wanting to making 1 million/year? Are some more profitable than others?

Posted: 08 Mar 2008 04:59 Post Subject: do insurance agents make money ?

If you want to make a million bucks, your best bet is to get a college degree (and enjoy the experience).

Become an expert on Internet marketing and understand the art of SEO.

Posted: 08 Mar 2008 01:19 Post Subject: how much money do insurance agents make ?

If you want to make a million a year find out how to generate decent leads and start a lead company

Posted: 08 Mar 2008 06:44 Post Subject: how much do insurance agents make?

Which do most have and which do you suggest for someone wanting to making 1 million/year? Are some more profitable than others?



Please understand that there is a HUGE difference between "wanting to make 1million/year" and "doing what it takes to make 1million/year".

It is certainly a possibility, just ask Zig Ziglar.

The best money to be made off a single sale just might be a traditional or indexed deferred annuity. For example, with one particular company, a $100,000 annuity, will pay $9,000 in sales commissions.

Just 112 of these per year will generate your $1 Million.

Maze

Posted: 09 Mar 2008 04:38 Post Subject: do insurance agents make money ?

Companies that pay 9% commish put a tremendous surrender fee or other charges on their product. I always stay away from them.

Posted: 30 Mar 2008 01:58 Post Subject:

Would you say a captive agent or an independent agent would make more their first year?
I am a new captive agent and I am curious what the average agent makes their first year.

Posted: 19 Oct 2008 10:14 Post Subject: InsInvestigator comments

It is not clear to me what InsInvestigator actually does? Is he/she an agent or a Lawyer?

A Lawyer that prosecutes agents and also sells policies??? Sounds like a lot of bs to me.

I don't know if you make more than me or not? I also don't care. Sounds like a bs agent.LOL

Posted: 20 Oct 2008 12:25 Post Subject:

lisa - need to know more about your situation. Did you start out with zero policies on your books or did you buy a book a business? What is your commission schedule? Since you are new, did they give you a bump on your commission for the first year?

Posted: 20 Oct 2008 06:01 Post Subject:

It is not clear to me what InsInvestigator actually does?



Insurance investigators butt-in during a claim process when the insurance company suspects fraud. The insurance investigators are neither agents nor lawyers and as the name suggests they prove into the claim to dig out the truths about it.

The profile of the insurance investigators has gained prominence with the increase in the number of fraudulent claims that the insurance companies are receiving everyday. The insurance investigators stop the dishonest claimants to cheat the insurance company.

~Jeremy

Posted: 20 Oct 2008 06:10 Post Subject:

Jeremy, I think that the insurance investigators also play an important role in regulating the insurance costs. Let me explain my stand…

The business of insurance runs on people living in the same risk bracket sharing the cost of risks within. This is what determines the cost of premium. Now if the insurance companies spend their money in fraudulent claims that will also increase the cost of the coverage for all the individuals participating in the coverage program. Insurance investigators, thus, by investigating into the frauds are saving the insurance companies from losing money on bad businesses and also saving the society from paying more for less.

Posted: 20 Oct 2008 06:16 Post Subject:

A life and heath insurance agent is likely to make more as commission than the P&C agent provided both of them have written same amount of business. And in addition to the questions put forward by life the earning of agent will depend largely upon his/her abilities to sniff business as well.

Thanks,
Rupert

Posted: 29 Oct 2008 05:03 Post Subject:

If you go out and are able to get agents to work for you then you can make a ton. If you can get a contract in the 100% range you can put agents under you for 80% or 90% and make a override everytime they sell something. That way you can have 10 guys selling and yourself.

Posted: 29 Oct 2008 06:09 Post Subject:

I have been in insurance for only 6 months now and I only sell P&C. The BEST way to get business is to educate everyone on what an AGENCY is compared to a COMPANY. I would say 75% of people dont know the differnce. If you advertise that you have 10-15 differnt companies you go through for the cheapest rate... they will call you back about 80% of the time and buy your product about 75% of the time.

You can always be a dick and do an AOR (Agent of record). If you have that same company the person is currently with and you cannot find a cheaper rate, you can ask them if they would like YOU to be their agent, instead of the other one. All you would have to do is sell your personality and let them gain confidence in you.

Try getting a license in P&C and Life/health. Start building your book and get other Agents to like you, a lot! Eventually talk to them about buying their book of business when they retire.

Once you make enough money you should hire someone to quote everything for you and sell it. You should have a CSR where you are now so you dont have to do to much work after you sell it, so you can focus on the big picture... MORE MONEY!

only 6 months in= $265,000+
And thats not including the books of business I bought (an extra $320,000+)

Posted: 29 Oct 2008 06:15 Post Subject:

Is that 265K premium dollars or gross paychecks you write yourself?

Posted: 29 Oct 2008 07:02 Post Subject:

Pay checks. I have a few BIG BIG commercial accounts.

Posted: 02 Nov 2008 06:15 Post Subject:

MEPower,
I was an agent with MetLife for a little more than 4 years. When I uncovered around 400 churning cases, I objected to my supervisors, who told me to look the other way. Instead of doing as I was told, I sent the cases directly to the CA Dept of Ins. I was then terminated by MetLife for "my inability to follow simple instructions." When my wrongful termination case settled, that was changed to "left of his own free will."

A short time later, I found myself with the CA DOI for almost 3 years. I left after I testified against our glorious insurance commissioner (who was terminated).

Afterwards, I moved down the street to the office of the Attorney General. I was encouraged to do so because the backlog of cases was so large, the statutes of limitations were running out before the cases could even be opened.

The whole time I worked with the State, I did not have an active insurance license (this is not allowed).

After the Governator took office, he eliminated certain positions in order to "trim the State's budget." My position was one of those he did away with. My license was reinstated and I moved to the private sector as a PI specializing in Life Insurance Fraud. I've qualified to work under CA section PC833 and have carried a weapon while working.

In the past 15 years, I have built a huge network of lawyers, legislators, and regulatory agency personnel. I have qualified as an Expert in many cases and am allowed to write an occasional policy as long as I stay well clear of any potential conflict of interest. I have been on the seminar circuit for a number of years and have either consulted for or appeared on every major news network.

As for the money, some years are better than others. I've made MDRT 6 times (2 before going with the State and 4 after going back on my own)
Because my business is somewhat unique, I am often exposed to sales opportunities most agents don't have access to. I even have lawyers and regulatory agencies referring business to me. That doesn't necessarily make me a better agent than you or anyone else, I've just gone in a slightly different direction. In fact, I only write 5 or 6 policies each year but, so far in my insurance career, I've written two policies with annual premiums in excess of $2 million.

I have a great team of superstar agents who help me out and I steer all the business that others might deem questionable to them.

If you'll email me, I'd be happy to send you a copy of my CV.

Now you know,
Mark

Posted: 02 Nov 2008 09:53 Post Subject:

In fact, I only write 5 or 6 policies each year but, so far in my insurance career, I've written two policies with annual premiums in excess of $2 million

ok, sorry I've just got to ask what on earth type/kind of policy has a 2mil. a year premium? :shock: :o

Posted: 02 Nov 2008 04:17 Post Subject:

Hi Lori,
The first was a $35m policy on a 74 year old woman in NY whose husband once employed Donald Trump. This story is on the front page of my website. After winning the case, her lawyer (who was also her son) suggested she do business with me. The Interest Sensitive Whole Life policy was for estate purposes.

The second was a $28m policy for a 61 year old man down in Carslbad, CA. He was one of the small group that started a company called BFI (also known as Allied Waste Industries, inc.) He bought a large Mass Mutual policy from a supposed estate planning guru who promised him that his premium would vanish in 3 - 5 years. Well, 7 years later, the premium had not only NOT vanished but actually needed to be increased. After the case settled, I re-wrote a type of UL blend policy with AmerUs (now Aviva).

Posted: 02 Nov 2008 04:42 Post Subject:

cha-ching...I'm just a blue collar workin' red neck...that 'kind' of money just boggles my mind...

Posted: 02 Nov 2008 05:11 Post Subject:

You know what's great about that? I've seldom seen any "red necks" who aren't honest, hard-working people, who'd give you the shirt off their backs. I got lucky; one day I got fed up with a dishonest system and stood my ground, just like you and almost any other red neck would have done. I didn't have a great deal of money or the power I neded to fight the system. I was, however, on the positive side of right versus wrong. I was standing on the railroad tracks telling old people in wheelchairs to get off the tracks, the train is coming. A bunch of sympathetic hearts and the major media jumped on it and I got my 15 minutes of fame.
Once the ball was passed to me, I ran with it. The rest is history.

Posted: 02 Nov 2008 07:55 Post Subject:

"...The first was a $35m policy on a 74 year old woman in NY whose husband once employed Donald Trump.... The Interest Sensitive Whole Life policy was for estate purposes....

The second was a $28m policy for a 61 year old man down in Carslbad, CA. He was one of the small group that started a company called BFI (also known as Allied Waste Industries, inc.)..."



Like I've said on other threads:
Sock-It-To-'em-Obama!!!
A vote for Obama is a vote for lawyers and insurance agents!

Gee whiz, InsInvestigator, WHY would a 74 year old woman need a $35,000,000 million dollar policy? :wink:

:P I thought A. L. Williams said as you grow older and more wealthy you don't need any life insurance and especaily NOT cash value life insurance at that age??!!??!!??!!??!!??!! :evil: :twisted: :P

Posted: 03 Nov 2008 01:58 Post Subject:

The value of their estate was in excess of $500M and her husband was uninsurable. I was not hired to ask questions, fact find, or make suggestions, just fill out and submit an application as per the son's instructions. I didn't put much work into that one at all. One of these days, I'll get a referral or two and life will be simpler.

Posted: 03 Nov 2008 11:38 Post Subject:

I'll get a referral or two and life will be simpler.

i hope so Mark... :wink:

Posted: 03 Nov 2008 05:48 Post Subject:

Thanks Lori, you've certainly given my day a bright start. I hope yours is also going great. :P

Posted: 09 Nov 2008 06:13 Post Subject: He is his architect

The insurance agent can all the money he wants in alife time in one year if he want it that way. hence, it depends on his hard work of openning and closing of sale that makes him his commission.

Posted: 17 Dec 2008 08:29 Post Subject: You earn what you keep.

My agency generates about 250K in revenue, which I use to pay myself, the staff, and expenses. Sometimes, there's not enough for me.

Posted: 29 Dec 2008 09:41 Post Subject:

"only 6 months in= $265,000+
And thats not including the books of business I bought (an extra $320,000+)"

"Is that 265K premium dollars or gross paychecks you write yourself?"

"Pay checks. I have a few BIG BIG commercial accounts."


WOW. I have to call B.S. when I see it, and I see it everywhere. First of all, I'd bet the farm that the poster claiming to have made $265,000 in 6 months is full of sh*t.(not that i disagree, just need to clean it up for ya' hon--lori) I've been an independent agent for about 10 years and have a sizable book, but that amount is ridiculous. I could see that amount being earned premium, but for the first 6 months in the industry I call BS. I've insured auto dealerships that pay over $1,000,000 in premium, but accounts of that size are heavliy marketed and VERY tough to get. Even harder to keep.

Maybe if your daddy owns the dealership you could get it, otherwise the odds of getting accounts that size the first 6 months in are ZERO. Why? Because A) Unless you have years experience, you won't know WTF you are doing to land it B) Clients quickly will know you don't know WTF you are doing C) Someone who does know WTF they are doing will come along and steal it.

Posted: 30 Dec 2008 12:19 Post Subject:

CobbNero has thrown down the red flag!



Let's do some math:

$265,000 in commission in 6 months would require a minimum of $1,325,000 in premium IF the agent got 20% commission.

Somebody correct me if I'm wrong but isn't typical P & C agent commission in the 10% to 15% range on average?

Using 10% commission the premium requirement to earn $265,000 would be $2,650,000.

To Easy wrote:

I have a few BIG BIG commercial accounts.



CobbNero wrote:

I've insured auto dealerships that pay over $1,000,000 in premium, but accounts of that size are heavily marketed and VERY tough to get.



CobbNero I fail to see the bllsht. Seems to me if the guy specializes, say in auto dealerships, the agent only needs 3 or 4 to earn that kind of money. Granted a brand new agent with zero experience couldn't do that. But a brand new agent being trained by his Father who has owned an agency or owns the agency could.

A brand new agent with only 6 month experience probably wouldn't know about the "Agent of Record" thingy without guidance from an experienced agent or agency either.

I say that because To Easy also wrote:

You can always be a dick and do an AOR (Agent of record). If you have that same company the person is currently with and you cannot find a cheaper rate, you can ask them if they would like YOU to be their agent, instead of the other one. All you would have to do is sell your personality and let them gain confidence in you.



That's "Experienced Agent" inside information there.

Posted: 30 Dec 2008 05:12 Post Subject:

gary you are correct p&c pays around 10-15% depending on if it's Auto or Home.

Posted: 05 Jan 2009 05:57 Post Subject: sell crazy somewhere else

It's still BS and here's why: Any agent on the independent side would know about AOR's on Day 1. Also, most companies don't like doing AORs and it isn't as easy as the poster describes. Secondly, I challenge anyone to get into the large commercial insurance business within 6 months of being licensed, even with your daddy's help. Here's why: If I'm an agent that currently has some large commercial accounts, before renewal time I reopen quotes for this business with other commercial carriers. Most carriers only allow one agent to run the quote with the company, so "first come, first serve." Thereby, I have no just elimanted much of my competition, because even if someone wants to come in and grab it, they can't.

I also call BS because this person says they bought a book of business on his/her own, implying their dad isn't working with them. Now maybe their dad is the person they bought it from and is assisting on the large commercial cases, but that means the dad's book was only $250,000 - in which case I doubt he did hardly any large commercial or his renewals would have been much higher.

Sorry folks, but I've been in this business far too long and heard the dreamings of far too many NEW agents - and that post is almost exactly what they all sound like. Granted, an agent CAN have those accomplishments, but NOT in the first 6 months.

Get a pitchfork for that load of horse dung.

Posted: 05 Jan 2009 06:00 Post Subject: correction

Sorry - daddy's book should have been $320,000, not $250,000. Same difference. 99% of the time, the big fish are landed by large agencies, meaning $1,000,000 in commissions or more. You need to be that big to get some of the large carrier appointments as well, which is another reason I call BS.

Posted: 07 Jan 2009 10:27 Post Subject:

Sorry folks, but I've been in this business far too long and heard the dreamings of far too many NEW agents - and that post is almost exactly what they all sound like.


Yes,... but,... you have to admit,... $265,000 in commission,... 6 months into the business,... does sound good!

Posted: 12 Mar 2009 10:59 Post Subject:

I made about 80,000 my first year selling life insurance and annuities, but I didn't start from scratch. I had my securities licenses and worked with a major bank (decent client base).

Posted: 13 Mar 2009 05:36 Post Subject:

I made about 78,000 in my first year.

Posted: 14 Mar 2009 03:52 Post Subject:

Hey Glenda, why not become a part of this community? You can surely add a lot to it. :)

~Jeremy

Posted: 27 Mar 2009 06:27 Post Subject: Making extra to supplement your income

If you are a licensed life and health insurance agent in your home state who would like the freedom to work from home selling life insurance products over the phone please contact me. It's a great way to make extra money during these tough times. You have complete control of your schedule. As a licensed agent providing services to clients, you'll receive inbound calls at your home from potential customers wanting to learn more about the products they have seen through various mediums, including mailers, TV spots, and sweepstakes. There is NO cold calling.
You will get a great per talk minute rate and sales incentives. Plus other perks like having your non-resident licenses paid for.
If you are really interested and your health/life state license is in good standing please contact me ASAP so I can get the process started for you.
I have been doing this work for over 2 years and was recently asked by the company to get new recruits because they are expanding.
Please email me with any questions:
theinsurancerecruiter AT gmail DOT com

We are not currently recruiting in the following states:
Texas, Massachusetts, New York, New Hampshire,
Connecticut, California, Oregon, Washington.

Posted: 29 Mar 2009 04:02 Post Subject:

A great way to make 'extra' money? Does that mean you are looking for the part-timers? That's about all we need in the industry now...more part-timers who don't take this as a serious career.

Posted: 11 Apr 2009 02:14 Post Subject:

Todd King is a joke. He calls himself an IMO. Works out of his house I bet. Ask him what kind of training he gives to agents. He don't even have a website. I think it is very sad for any IMO to recruit from forums. Is this how IMO's make their living? I bet some of them put ads on craigslist too. What a joke. I'm going to become an IMO soon, and work out of my house.

Posted: 11 Apr 2009 03:20 Post Subject:

Spencer,
I don't know who you are. You obviously know my name, but that must be all you know about me. You want to visit my website? www[dot]ngfgllc[dot]com
I never claimed to give training to agents. I actually hire very few untrained agents. My contracts are not for those agents.
Is it really that sad that I give agents an opportunity that they don't get somewhere else?
What I do is help people. You, my stealth friend may be alien to that concept but I'm not.
Why don't you come from behind the shadows and let me know who you are. But then again, if you did that, I'll be willing to bet I could probably share a story of why you are out to defame me for no good reason. Did I say something to hurt your feelings on another forum or something?
You should be careful with your accusations out of ignorance else they may come back to bite you. There are a few people on this forum who know me very well and know what I do for people to help them.
What do you do for people my friend? Not very much I suspect!
You want to hide in the shadows and call me a joke? If you think you have the "truth" about something, come on out and present it like a real man!
Otherwise, stay in the shadows and make your little childish accusations and continue to act in childish ways.
If in fact I have wronged you in any way, please let me know, I'll do what I can to set it right...I never deliberately try to hurt someone, but I will go out of my way to make a thing right.

Website link deactivated as per the forum rules

Posted: 11 Apr 2009 11:04 Post Subject:

Hi Ohio,

I happen to be all of the above...with the exception of having a complete understanding of the internet. Therefore I am not making a million bucks per year.


So, you're highlighting the impact of internet technology within the insurance industry! Are you pointing at a larger database being covered online? Or is it that you're stressing upon a wider and more flexible agent network online? I'd be glad to listen to you.

Steven

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